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goTenna Mesh

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Steven Frank (tweet):

So what’s a goTenna Mesh? It’s a portable battery-powered antenna that’s capable of forming an ad-hoc wireless mesh network with other goTenna Mesh units in-range. That is to say, they don’t connect to the internet, wi-fi, or the cellular network -- just to each other.

[…]

The most realistic use-case right now is for people who need to communicate at a distance, but do not have cellular network coverage.

[…]

Unlike many goTenna users, I'm rarely off the beaten path deep in the woods, or on an ocean cruise. I bought my goTennas to show my support for an ideal that I strongly believe in: that there should be an affordable, easy-to-use, community-owned alternative to big telecom infrastructure, and that public spectrum is a wonderful thing that we should use.

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peelman
15 days ago
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eye roll. i applaud most democratic efforts, but this is just dumb. these would be useful under specific circumstances, but for what Steven is advocating for? nothing that runs in the unlicensed spectrum is suited or capable. also worth nothing that unlicensed doesn’t mean unregulated. you can operate all the 2.4Ghz devices you want, but your power output is still limited, and the size and height of the antenna is still limited.
Seymour, Indiana
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I Can’t Decide on a New Miter Saw for a Future “Miter Saw Station”

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Dewalt DW716XPS 12-inch Compound Miter Saw

I have been trying to decide on a new compound miter saw, and it has been a tough process that has me flip-flopping back and forth.

At the moment, the Dewalt DW716XPS is at the top of my shortlist. It’s a 12″ dual-bevel non-sliding miter saw with LED shadow cut-line guidance. This saw has a maximum cutting capacity of 2″ x 10″ at 90°. It can can bevel left or right to 48°, and miter left and right to 50°. Without utilizing the back fence, the cut capacity is 2″ x 8″.

My aim is to keep this saw – or whatever miter saw I end up choosing – mounted to a benchtop as part of a miter saw station, with raised benchtops to the left and right of it. There will be below-bench dust collection, and potentially a dust shroud to help capture more dust.

If I need wider cutting capacity, I can use a circular saw or table saw, or a test sample miter saw, as it seems I am always testing one or more cordless models.

LED shadow-light cut-line guidance is almost a must-have on cordless saws. Even though my miter saw station will eventually have rulers on the side fences, there will be times when a board will be marked, and not measured, and so a shadow of the blade kerf will still be handy to set up the cut.

I haven’t planned out the saw’s location yet, but as of now I don’t think I want a slider, as they simply take up too much space.

Here’s a tough question – what will it be used for? Now, I’ll move a miter saw outside if I need to make long cuts. Let’s say I need to cut a 2x4x8′ down to 60″. Or, let’s say I want to cut it in half. That’s going to require a 10-foot span of workbenches, which I simply don’t have the space for.

But, when cross-cutting boards for any number of smaller projects that I do, it’ll be incredibly convenient for me to have a “miter saw station,” where I can use a stop block and make repeated cuts at a saw that’s already set up and ready to go.

So then my thoughts turn towards “well, maybe I should then go with a 10″ saw.” But that would result in fewer options unless I wanted to dial-back on certain features, such as the dual bevel angle range or XPS/cutline light.

Milwaukee M18 Fuel Compact Sliding Miter Saw in Closed Position

I have also wondered if maybe I should buy a personal copy of the Milwaukee M18 Fuel 7-1/4″ sliding miter saw that I’ve been using so much recently. It has a 2×8″ horizontal cutting capacity, just like the Dewalt 12″ I had been considering.

While blade selection isn’t as good, I’m still able to find what I need. Last week, I picked up a Diablo non-ferrous blade for cutting aluminum channels. I’ve been flip-flipping about buying a 14″ saw for such work, but for the time being, miter saws with non-ferrous blades are good enough for most of my needs.

Something like the M18 Fuel saw can be bolted down for regular use, and taken outside or to a stand when I need to cut longer work than my eventual “miter saw station” can allow for. Maybe I can work out some type of quick-release bolt-down solution that allows me to slide the saw forward and out. That could be true for any saw, although it’ll be easier with something as small as as a 7-1/4″ slider.

I don’t work with crown molding; most of my miter saw needs are for cross-cutting project boards, shelves, or trim that can be cut flat against the base.

Most likely, I will flip-flop between choices until November comes around. There were some great deals last year, and so since my needs aren’t urgent, it’s safe to wait until then.

Tied for first-place: Dewalt 12″ dual-bevel DW716XPS, and Milwaukee M18 Fuel 7-1/4″. It sounds weird to me too, to consider a cordless saw for more or less fixed-position placement, but it’s a good saw that I love using, and one that’s far more portable than larger saws.

Following far behind those two choices would be a 10″ non-sliding saw, or perhaps a 10″ slider – maybe the new Ridgid?

Decisions, decisions.

What miter saw are you using right now, and would you recommend it?

In case you’re not familiar with the concept, here’s a miter saw station Google image search. It’s basically a long workbench with a lowered section at the center for a miter saw. The top of the miter saw base is at the same height as the adjacent benchtops, and there are often fences or other fixtures for setting accurate and repeatable cuts.

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peelman
27 days ago
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Bosch all the way. i WILL own an AxialGlide someday.
Seymour, Indiana
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Will it Fit? Milwaukee M18 12.0Ah Battery and LED Lighting Compatibility (and Details About Free Upgrades)

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Milwaukee M18 12Ah High Output Battery

In reply to my post on the new Milwaukee M18 Rocket LED tower light, Isaiah asked: does it fit the new 12.0Ah batteries?

That’s a good question. The new M18 High Output 12.0Ah battery pack is larger than even their 9.0Ah battery pack.

I thought it would be compatible, since the new tripod LED worklight was designed more or less alongside the 12.0Ah battery, but it was logical to double check with Milwaukee. Here’s what they said:

Yes, it does accept the new 12.0Ah battery!

They also provided me with a list of current M18 LED worklights that do not accept with the 12.0Ah battery. Some lighting products do work with the newest battery, the highest capacity battery in Milwaukee’s M18 platform at the moment, but these are the ones that don’t.

Lighting products not on the list, such as the 2151-20 site light, and the new 2131-20 Rocket tripod light, should be assumed to be compatible.

  • 2122-20 Utility Bucket Light
  • 2130-20 ROCKET Tower Light
  • 2135-20 ROCKET LED Tower Light/Charger
  • 2145-20 RADIUS LED Compact Site Light
  • 2146-20 One-Key RADIUS LED Compact Site Light
  • 2361-20 LED Flood Light

What if you have one of these worklights that are not compatible with the 12.0Ah battery? That’s unfortunate, right? Well…

These products are all available for free service upgrade kits which would make them perform with the 12.0 battery. Users just need to go to our eService page and search for the product they want to upgrade and request the 12.0 Service Upgrade. Shipping is totally free and turnaround is normally 7-10 business days. If they’re upgrading the 2122-20 or 2361-20 they can also request an upgrade sent to them for free which can be easily installed by the user.

That’s unexpected, and a pretty sweet deal. I believe I heard about this offer before, but it’s really caught my attention now.

Here’s Milwaukee’s eService page.

You have to package your product, which might be hard when you’re talking about a 40″ Rocket light, and drop it off at a FedEx shipping facility, but Milwaukee will cover shipping fees both ways.

So, there you have it. The M18 12.0Ah battery will fit M18 lighting products except for those on the list above, and if you have one that’s not compatible and you want to change that, Milwaukee will update your light for free.

Just when I thought I couldn’t like Milwaukee even more, they raise my impression of them even higher.

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peelman
27 days ago
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the sale of one 12Ah battery probably covers the cost of an upgrade kit for these lights. so thinking Milwaukee is doing this out of sympathy or loyalty may be a bit presumptuous.
Seymour, Indiana
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45 Piece Repair Toolkit

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This is the tool kit ($8) I reach for first whenever I need to take apart some piece of consumer electronics. It has a handle, a shaft extender, tweezers, and 42 different driver bits, including ones for torx, hex, flathead, cross, triangle, star, and circle screws. I have yet to come across a tamper proof screw that I can’t open with one of these bits. The quality of the set, and the plastic box the parts come in, are excellent, especially given the price.

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peelman
28 days ago
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much prefer my Tekton set (https://www.amazon.com/TEKTON-28301-Everybit-Electronics-Precision/dp/B00VJYWRKW) which lives in my bag, or my larger ifixit kit if i have my broader set of tools available.
Seymour, Indiana
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Under the Hood – vSphere 6.7 Update 1

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In conjunction with the announcement of vSphere Platinum we also have announced vSphere 6.7 Update 1 (note: general availability will be later this year). vSphere 6.7 U1 is an important release that not only signifies enterprise readiness but also brings in some important new features and enhancements. It also provides an upgrade path from vSphere 6.5 U2 to vSphere 6.7 U1.

Here are the areas we’ve focused on for this release:

vSphere Client

Let’s first take a look at the vSphere Client. From vSphere 6.7 U1 onward, the vSphere Client is the only client you’ll need to manage vCenter Server. As promised here, all administrative functions have now been completed for the vSphere Client. No more switching between clients to perform actions such as setting up a vCenter HA (VCHA) cluster or using vSphere Update Manager (VUM) to update VMware Tools. Many of the latest additions have not only showed up in the vSphere Client but they’ve also been improved in the process. Setting up a VCHA cluster has been greatly simplified, for example. No longer are there multiple workflows (formerly Basic and Advanced). Look for other common tasks such as deploying from a Content Library, Advanced Search, configuring scheduled tasks, and more top-N charts.

vCenter Server Converge Tool

Next, we have one of my personal favorites and probably one of the most anticipated tools – the vCenter Server Converge Tool. This tool allows an administrator to migrate from an external Platform Services Controller (PSC) architecture into the simpler, easy-to-manage embedded PSC architecture. This means fewer VMs to manage, no more load balancers for HA, and no complex multi-site replication topologies. While we announced support for Enhanced Linked Mode (ELM) with embedded PSCs for vSphere 6.7 and vSphere 6.5 U2, many customers already had external PSC topologies. For many of those customers it just hasn’t been feasible to rebuild to take advantage of this new, simpler architecture. Until now. The vCenter Server Converge Tool works by installing an embedded PSC on the vCenter Server Appliance and establishing a replication agreement between the embedded PSC and the external PSC. Once this process has been completed for all vCenter Servers using a given external PSC, that external PSC can then be decommissioned. Then, if you need HA, VCHA handles the replication of the embedded PSC state to the passive node so it is all built-in. So, even if you do currently have one of those complex, multisite, HA topologies with a load balancer, you can use the Converge Tool to migrate to a much simpler, efficient architecture. Note that the Converge Tool only supports vSphere 6.7 U1 so you’ll have to get your upgrade completed before you can simplify your vCenter Server environment. The tool itself is launch via a CLI utility – vcsa-converge-cli – and is included on the VCSA ISO. It runs on Windows, macOS, and Linux just like the VCSA installer and uses json templates for configuration.

The vCenter Server Converge Tool is located on the VCSA ISO

One other gap that we needed to fill that relates to the Converge Tool is the ability to move (or repoint) an vCenter Server with embedded PSC from one vSphere SSO Domain to another. A similar capability was released with vSphere 6.7 which allowed for the repoint of a vCenter Server to a different vSphere SSO Domain to another but it only worked with external PSCs. Now, you have the flexibility to combine, merge, or separate vSphere SSO Domains to get to the architecture that best suits your organization’s needs without time consuming and difficult rebuilds or migrations. Emad is planning some detailed walkthroughs and demos of both capabilities as we get closer to GA so watch for some announcements from him.

Enhancements for HCI and vSAN

This next set of features is aimed at making it easier to setup, configure, and scale host clusters. In this release we’ve added a new workflow called Cluster Quickstart which provides one simple, efficient wizard to create a cluster, add hosts, and configure those hosts so they are all identical. This configuration includes HA & DRS, Enhanced vMotion Compatibility (EVC), a vSAN datastore, and networking including a Virtual Distributed Switch (VDS). With Cluster Quickstart you can go from zero to fully functioning cluster in a matter of minutes. And, when it is time to expand the cluster, there is a simple workflow to add new hosts and configure them using the cluster settings used during initial setup. This new workflow also includes a cluster validation that can be used to ensure all settings have been properly configured on all hosts and will report any discrepancies.

One other important improvement in this area is the integration of I/O controller firmware update with VUM. Customers are now able to remediate software and firmware in one maintenance cycle under a single VUM UI. It is much faster and safer to do cluster remediation in one operation. vSAN HCL checks are built-in to ensure the host being remediated is compliant to the vSAN HCL before VUM moves to the next host. The I/O controller firmware is updated via an integration with the server vendor’s firmware update utility. VUM will detect if the appropriate utility is missing and prompt the administrator to download it as shown in the screenshot below. Then, VUM can download the appropriate I/O controller firmware from the server vendor’s repository or utilize a user-configured local repo. This firmware is then included in the system managed vSAN baselines to ensure the recommended I/O controller firmware is always being installed when remediating hosts.

Enhanced Content Library

Content Library in vSphere 6.7 Update 1 enables the importing of OVA templates from a HTTPS endpoint and local storage, as well as syncing content from OVA templates to other vCenter Servers. As part of the import of OVA templates, Content Library handles and verifies the OVA bundle’s certificate and manifest files in adherence to security best practices. In addition, Content Library now natively supports VM templates (VMTX) and associated operations such as deploying a VM directly from Content Library. These improvements make working with Content Libraries more efficient and prevent the need to copy objects in and out of Content Library to do meaningful operations. Note that syncing of VM templates to another vCenter Server is not yet available in vSphere 6.7 Update 1.

vMotion for NVIDIA Quadro vDWS

With vSphere 6.7 Update 1, VMware and NVIDIA have collaborated to significantly enhance the operational flexibility and utilization of virtual infrastructure accelerated with NVIDIA Quadro vDWS (formerly known as GRID) vGPU technology.

Following the introduction of Suspend and Resume capabilities in vSphere 6.7, VMware and NVIDIA are introducing VMware vSphere vMotion with NVIDIA Quadro vDWS vGPU powered VMs. Now, infrastructure administrators can perform maintenance operations on the underlying GPU accelerated VDI or Compute infrastructure while ensuring that end-users and their applications are  not disrupted. For example, consider an emergency patching or urgent infrastructure operation needed to be carried out on the NVIDIA Quadro vDWS vGPU accelerated VDI infrastructure of a group of industrial designers, designing CAD models of a new product. Previously, to carry out that maintenance operation, all of the VDI desktops had to be completely powered off, disrupting their work and lowering their productivity. Alternatively, the administrator had to wait until after-hours and hope they all adhered to the IT team’s request to save their work, otherwise, it would be lost. With the introduction of VMware vSphere vMotion for NVIDIA Quadro vDWS vGPU powered VMs, these complexities are a thing of the past as IT administrators can seamlessly migrate the vGPU powered VMs to another host and perform the required maintenance, eliminating productivity disruption and increasing the agility of the IT staff.

Conclusion

vSphere 6.7 Update 1 is an exciting release. Not only does it add support for vSphere Platinum but it includes a number of exciting new features. If you’ve been waiting to upgrade to vSphere 6.7 then start planning your upgrade. If you’re just waiting to finally get rid of flash or your external PSCs, have the ability to more efficiently manage your HCI environment, or vMotion your NVIDIA Quadro workloads, then start getting prepared to upgrade!

The post Under the Hood – vSphere 6.7 Update 1 appeared first on VMware vSphere Blog.

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peelman
28 days ago
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“It also provides an upgrade path from vSphere 6.5 U2 to vSphere 6.7 U1.”

this is the only thing i give a damn about with this release. whatever new bells and whistles they added were moot without a way for me to get from 6.5U2 to 6.7.
Seymour, Indiana
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Version 3

1 Comment and 3 Shares

We are proud to introduce the latest iteration of the Day One journaling application. Version 3 is a major update to the foundation of the app text editor with redesigned shortcut menus for text formatting and adding content like photos and tags. Accompanying this update are two new Premium features, Dark Mode and Audio Recording.

Day One's new content editor menu, audio recording, and dark mode shown on the iPhone X.

Dark Mode

Dark Mode has been applied throughout the app with a custom theme, utilizing the pure black on the iPhone X True Tone display looks amazing.

Dark Mode Auto Toggle setting will update Light/Dark mode based on the sunset time in your current location. 

Audio recording is available in 2 modes:

  • 1-Minute Transcription Mode uses Apple’s Speech dictation service. Transcription is auto-added to the entry after recording ends.
  • 30-Minute Audio-Only Mode.

Audio Tip: Long-press on the audio record button for option to select a 1-time recording mode. Default setting is in Settings > Advanced.

You may also import audio clips via share extension, or paste from clipboard (from Voice Memos, Voicemail, and more. 

Day One Audio recording on the iPhone X

New Unified Editor

We’ve been working on a new, custom text editor for over a year as a way to unify and improve the experience of writing and composing a journal entry.

Previously we relied on 2 separate views for an entry; Edit Mode, a native text editor with some Markdown highlighting, and Read Mode, a web-view to render Markdown to HTML. The separate views created a disconnect in certain cases like longer entries, if you wanted to make an edit at the bottom while in Read Mode, toggling to Edit mode wouldn’t line up exactly where you were.

As we started exploring Audio Recording and Dark Mode, we realized a value this unified editor would bring to the overall experience in Day One. Now it’s a single view in both modes, no more HTML view. To continue support for Markdown, Markdown Tabled, and HTML embeds, we came up with an interesting solution using code blocks.

Code blocks now have a toggle button to switch between Code View and Web View. Existing Markdown Tables will be auto detected, wrapped in a code block and toggled to Web View. Preserving the rendered table, and allowing it to be modified and edited. The state of each code block toggle is saved to the entry and synced to preserve the desired state of each block.

Day One New Rich Editor on the iPhone X.

Checklists are another great benefit to the new editor as you can now toggle the checklist items in edit or read mode. What you see is what you get.

Markdown basics like headers, lists, bold, italic, rule lines, are auto converted to rich text, instantly hiding the markdown syntax. We’ve also added a new content editor menu that makes adding this text formatting easy without knowing the Markdown shortcuts.

See the full release notes here:
http://help.dayoneapp.com/release-notes/ios-release-notes

Review by The Sweet Setup here:

Day One for iOS hits version 3, introduces audio snippets, dark mode, and tons more

Upvote us on Product Hunt: 
https://www.producthunt.com/posts/day-one-3-2

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peelman
28 days ago
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love me some day one. so glad to see then doing so well.
Seymour, Indiana
MotherHydra
28 days ago
I really should give this a try. Looks incredibly deep.
digdoug
27 days ago
I used their printing service a while back too. It generated a lovely tome from all my entries that sits on my shelf. I wish I could get back into the habit of using it again.
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